Tag Archives: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Reduce Stress with Spaghetti Body

What is Spaghetti Body?

Spaghetti Body is a relaxation technique known as Progressive Muscle Relaxation . Progressive muscle relaxation involves tensing and relaxing muscle groups. In this activity, kids tense and relax muscles while pretending to be uncooked and cooked spaghetti.

What are the benefits?

Spaghetti Body teaches children how to relax their muscles when they are tight. Research shows progressive muscle relaxation can reduce anxiety and stress. Additionally, Spaghetti Body helps improve attention, mindful awareness, concentration, and self-concept.

How to practice Spaghetti Body at home:

  • Make you body straight and tight like a piece of uncooked spaghetti. Glue everything together and squeeze.
  • Breathe slowly in and out through your nose. Your belly should rise as you breathe in and fall as you breathe out.
  • Notice how you feel. This is what happens to your body when you are mad or nervous.
  • Imagine that your uncooked spaghetti noodle is being placed in a pan of hot water. The noodle is wet and it begins so soften.
  • Breathe in as you curl your toes in and scrunch your feet. Hold for one, two, three. Breathe out as you start to wiggle your toes and let your feet begin to soften just like a wet, warm, noodle. Wet noodles are relaxed and wiggly – not tight and stiff.
  • As you breath in tighten your legs. One, two, three. As you breathe out start to wiggle your legs and let them relax.
  • Take a deep breath in and make your hands into tight fists and your arms straight and tight. Hold for one, two, three, now let all the air out as you relax your fingers and arms into a wet wiggly noodle.
  • Take a deep breath in as you bring your shoulders up by your ears. Scrunch your shoulders. One, two, three. Breathe out as you let your shoulders begin to soften and relax down your back.
  • Close your eyes and scrunch up your entire face. Breathe in. One, two three, release your breath and let your face relax.
  • I like to squeeze a fresh lemon on cooked spaghetti noodles. If you would like lemon squeezed on your noodle raise your hand I will put a cotton ball with lemon essential oil in it.
  • Ta-da – you are a cooked spaghetti noodle! Scan your noodle to make sure all the tightness is gone. Let your body feel relaxed and calm. Breathe in and out through your nose slowly. Notice how you feel.

At Mindful Child, we like to pair Spaghetti Body with Spaghetti Pose, which is an activity from Mindfulness for Children: 150+ Activities for Happier, Healthier, Stress-Free Kids, by Dr. Tracy. This adds extra benefits such as deep breathing, tactile discrimination, and flexibility.

If you’d like to learn more activities for home or the classroom sign up for the Mindful Child Teacher Training and become a kid’s yoga teacher!





The Benefits of Intelligence Testing

IQ Intelligence Quotient Test Score Numbers Level

HOW DID IT BEGIN?

Intelligence testing began in the 1900s to identify children who needed specialized assistance with school. During World War I intelligence tests known as the Army Alpha and Beta tests were used to determine which soldiers were more suited for leadership positions. In 1955, American psychologist, David Wechsler, developed a series of intelligence tests to test preschool children, school age children, and adults. Wechsler’s intelligence tests are widely used today to determine learning disabilities and gifted ability.

WHAT IS INTELLIGENCE TESTING?

Intelligence testing is a bit like a brainteaser. The individual taking the test is asked to translate a code using a key, find missing objects in pictures, and manipulate blocks to replicate abstract designs. Sounds fun, right?

SHOULD I HAVE MY CHILD TESTED?

If your child is struggling academically or has been identified as having attention deficit hyperactivity disorder an IQ test yields significant information that can aide the school in determining individualized modifications and accommodations. IQ testing is a necessary component of a comprehensive evaluation, not because of the score it provides, but the wealth of information it delivers concerning the child’s cognitive processing ability or problem-solving skills. Since all children are unique, understanding how they solve problems is fundamental to determining how to educate them. Children do not all learn the same way. Some children require visual support, others need auditory support, and a growing number of children necessitate extended time or simple directions. Finally, all children need movement breaks to varying degrees, but that is a discussion for another post…